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Canoe Tripping in Algonquin - Then and Now
Three canoe tripping experiences! Over 100 years apart, yet connected in time in so many ways! Check out these insights into how the canoe tripping experience in Algonquin Park has changed and yet not changed at all.(order/details)

 

BOOKS
Gertrude Baskerville: The Lady of Algonquin Park - $15.00 CDN : Summary

About the Book
In the spring of 1941, Gertrude Baskerville set our from the Kitchener area with her ailing husband and 16-year old son to join her brother in establishing a new life on the shores of South Tea Lake in Algonquin Park. Within a year her husband had died, her son was shipped overseas to fight in WWII and her brother decided that better opportunity lay for him and his family to move to British Columbia. Gertie as she was called, was totally alone. But Algonquin Park had captured her soul, so rather than return to Kitchener to live with her daughter, she decided to stay and see if she could carve out a life for herself in the Algonquin Park wilderness. This is her story. The Lady of Algonquin Park as she became known in the 1970’s due to a series of articles written about her by Outdoors Writers of Canada author Stan Tripp. Stan would call or visit and write a column about Gerties adventures. For years afterward she would get cards and letters and visitors from people from all over the world.

Gertrude Baskerville - Review Comments

"GERTRUDE BASKERVILLE” is a fascinating look into the life of an independent woman who lived for 35 years in a small cabin with nothing but the local wildlife to keep her company and a woodstove to ward off the chill. …Valerie Hill, The Kitchener-Waterloo Record (May, 2002)

The author’s meticulours research, and careful attention to detail along with her smooth writing style combine to make Gertrude’s story come to life. Of particular interest is the poetic quality of the prologue that embraces the life and spirit of “The Lady of Algonquin Park”. Colourful anecdotes and appealing photographs as well as diagrams and maps further enable the reader to visualize and appreciate this remarkable woman’s life. … Eleanor Kidd, The Huntsville Forrester, Weekender (Nov 9, 2001)

The earlier of Clemson’s two volumes is a tribute to a woman who spent more than 35 years living in Algonquin Park. From 1942 through 1969 Gertie Baskerville, a ‘free spirit and a tough lady, “ lived year-round in a 20-by-20 foot log cabin on the shores of South Tea Lake. For a further decade she returned faithfully for six months of each year and then, until her death in 1983 at age 88, for a few days holiday with her family each summer. Her tribute to Gertie Baskerville is endearing and educational – a must for your Muskoka Bookshelf. … Brad Hammond Editor Vintage Muskoka Magazine (Aug. 2003)

 

 

Reviews
 
Exerpts

Muskoka Bookshelf - Gertrude Baskerville Review
[Read Review]

Valerie Hill, The Kitchener-Waterloo Record
[Read Review]

 

 

 

Prologue

The clock struck 10pm as she headed out in her snowshoes across the frozen lake. It was hard to believe that after 60 years of wear, they still were in good repair.  The evening had been a pleasant diversion. Her visits with Michael Lundy and his wife Meryl for an evening of cards, at their Camp Tamakwa cabin on the north shore of South Tea Lake were a welcome respite in the dead of winter. They didn’t talk, much which suited Gertie just fine. After 30 years alone up here in the Park, people and their mindless chatter was getting harder and harder to take these days. Not that she had much choice for evening companions. Other than the Stringers (Jimmy and Wam) and the Gibson’s (Gibby and Lulu) up at Potter Creek on Canoe Lake, there weren’t many up here – at least not in the winter. Everybody else hightailed it out of here in late October as soon as the snow began to fly. [Read Full Exerpt]

 

 


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